Did you know?

LastManStanding

Well-known member
Banana facts -

. There are several hundred varieties of bananas worldwide, but the one that most of us slice on our cereal is the Cavendish. The Cavendish is favored by commercial producers for its size, flavor, and most important, resistance to disease.
Ever wonder why bananas have no seeds? Because of natural mutations, the kind we eat don't have any-
the dark dots in the center are all that's left. (Bananas reproduce by underground stems, or rhizomes.) . A few forgotten banana products: banana wine, banana flour (cheaper than wheat flour), banana ketchup, banana pickles, banana vinegar, and Melzo, a powdered-banana drink mix.
Here's something more: You can also grow banana trees from banana flowers. Cut the banana flower from the stem with one clean slice, apply fresh aloe vera on the cut, and plant it in compost.
Here's even more: You can cook a delicious curry with the banana flower. Or you can fry it and pickle it. You can cook the innermost bark of the banana tree into a delicious curry. I think that's done only with certain varieties, but you can. And rich with fibre and vitamins it's very nutritious.
 

Sass Muffin

Coffee Queen ☕🩺
Gold Site Supporter
FB_IMG_1707959725077.jpg
 

Johnny West

Well-known member

Did you know?​

The March full moon is known as the Worm Moon.

March is named after the Roman god of war, Mars.

The Field Record Book​

Northern pike (Esox lucius)

Biggest caught in the UK by rod and reel: 47lb 11oz, Loch Lomond, 1945, caught by Tommy Morgan

Biggest caught in the world by rod and reel: 55lb 1oz, Lake of Grefeern, Germany, 16 October 1986, caught by Lothar Louis

Biggest ever recorded: 67lb 1oz, Dannstadt Gravel Pit, Germany, 1983, caught by nets
 

Johnny West

Well-known member

Did you know?​

The March full moon is known as the Worm Moon.

March is named after the Roman god of war, Mars.

The Field Record Book​

Northern pike (Esox lucius)

Biggest caught in the UK by rod and reel: 47lb 11oz, Loch Lomond, 1945, caught by Tommy Morgan

Biggest caught in the world by rod and reel: 55lb 1oz, Lake of Grefeern, Germany, 16 October 1986, caught by Lothar Louis

Biggest ever recorded: 67lb 1oz, Dannstadt Gravel Pit, Germany, 1983, caught by nets

Advice for Young Fielders​

Language of Fieldsports


"Our ‘modern’ language of fieldsports has evolved into something equally as complicated and idiosyncratic as that of previous centuries; thus, a dog has a tail, a hound a stern, an otter a rudder, a deer a single, a fox a brush and a hare a scut. We count hounds in couples but greyhounds in braces or a leash if there are three; we call “mark cock” when we see woodcock but “cock forrard” for a cock pheasant; a salmon is awarded the honour of being simply a fish, while lesser species are named specifically. These only touch on the dictionary of proper terms in the historic language of fieldsports, which every young sportsman should learn if we are to preserve our sporting culture and heritage for future generations"

SIR JOHNNY SCOTT
 

Luckytrim

Grill Master
Gold Site Supporter
Sorry about the length, but it took a while to get it all laid out ...

The United States declared its independence in 1776, yet George Washington did not take office until April 30, 1789. So who was running the country during these initial years of our young country?
In fact, the first President of the United States was named John Hanson! I can hear you now - John who? John Hanson, was the first President of The United States. There was also a U.S. stamp made in his honor.
The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation. This document was actually proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Once the signing took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country.
John Hanson, was chosen unanimously by Congress (which included George Washington). In fact, all the other potential candidates refused to run against him, as he was a major player in the revolution and an extremely influential member of Congress. As the first President, Hanson had quite the shoes to fill. No one had ever been President and the role was poorly defined. His actions in office would set precedent for all future Presidents. He took office just as the Revolutionary War ended. Almost immediately, the troops demanded to be paid. As would be expected after any long war, there were no funds to meet the salaries. As a result, the soldiers threatened to overthrow the new government and put Washington on the throne as a monarch. All the members of Congress ran for their lives, leaving Hanson as the only guy left running the government. He somehow managed to calm the troops down and hold the country together. If he had failed, the government would have fallen almost immediately and everyone would have been bowing to King Washington. Hanson, as President, ordered all foreign troops off American soil, as well as the removal of all foreign flags. This was quite the feat, considering the fact that so many European countries had a stake in the United States since the days following Columbus. Hanson established the Great Seal of the United States, which all Presidents have since been required to use on all official documents. President Hanson also established the first Treasury Department, the first Secretary of War, and the first Foreign Affairs Department. The Articles of Confederation only allowed a President to serve a one year term during any three year period, so Hanson actually accomplished quite a bit in such little time.
Seven other presidents were elected after him:
1. John Hanson
2. Elias Boudinot (1782-83)
3. Thomas Mifflin (1783-84)
4. Richard Henry Lee (1784-85)
5. John Hancock (1785-86)
6. Nathan Gorman (1786-87)
7. Arthur St. Clair (1787-88)
8. Cyrus Griffin (1788-89),
...all served prior to George Washington ever taking office. So what happened? Why don't we hear about the first eight presidents? It's quite simple - The Articles of Confederation didn't work well. The individual states had too much power and nothing could be agreed upon. A new doctrine needed to be written - something we know as the Constitution. And that leads us to the end of our story. George Washington definitely was not the first President of the United States. He was the first President of the United States under the Constitution we follow today. And the first eight Presidents have been forgotten in history.
 

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
Gold Site Supporter
Sorry about the length, but it took a while to get it all laid out ...

The United States declared its independence in 1776, yet George Washington did not take office until April 30, 1789. So who was running the country during these initial years of our young country?
In fact, the first President of the United States was named John Hanson! I can hear you now - John who? John Hanson, was the first President of The United States. There was also a U.S. stamp made in his honor.
The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation. This document was actually proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Once the signing took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country.
John Hanson, was chosen unanimously by Congress (which included George Washington). In fact, all the other potential candidates refused to run against him, as he was a major player in the revolution and an extremely influential member of Congress. As the first President, Hanson had quite the shoes to fill. No one had ever been President and the role was poorly defined. His actions in office would set precedent for all future Presidents. He took office just as the Revolutionary War ended. Almost immediately, the troops demanded to be paid. As would be expected after any long war, there were no funds to meet the salaries. As a result, the soldiers threatened to overthrow the new government and put Washington on the throne as a monarch. All the members of Congress ran for their lives, leaving Hanson as the only guy left running the government. He somehow managed to calm the troops down and hold the country together. If he had failed, the government would have fallen almost immediately and everyone would have been bowing to King Washington. Hanson, as President, ordered all foreign troops off American soil, as well as the removal of all foreign flags. This was quite the feat, considering the fact that so many European countries had a stake in the United States since the days following Columbus. Hanson established the Great Seal of the United States, which all Presidents have since been required to use on all official documents. President Hanson also established the first Treasury Department, the first Secretary of War, and the first Foreign Affairs Department. The Articles of Confederation only allowed a President to serve a one year term during any three year period, so Hanson actually accomplished quite a bit in such little time.
Seven other presidents were elected after him:
1. John Hanson
2. Elias Boudinot (1782-83)
3. Thomas Mifflin (1783-84)
4. Richard Henry Lee (1784-85)
5. John Hancock (1785-86)
6. Nathan Gorman (1786-87)
7. Arthur St. Clair (1787-88)
8. Cyrus Griffin (1788-89),
...all served prior to George Washington ever taking office. So what happened? Why don't we hear about the first eight presidents? It's quite simple - The Articles of Confederation didn't work well. The individual states had too much power and nothing could be agreed upon. A new doctrine needed to be written - something we know as the Constitution. And that leads us to the end of our story. George Washington definitely was not the first President of the United States. He was the first President of the United States under the Constitution we follow today. And the first eight Presidents have been forgotten in history.

Wow, LT! So interesting! Thanks!

Lee
 

rickismom

Low Carb Home Cook
Site Supporter
Sorry about the length, but it took a while to get it all laid out ...

The United States declared its independence in 1776, yet George Washington did not take office until April 30, 1789. So who was running the country during these initial years of our young country?
In fact, the first President of the United States was named John Hanson! I can hear you now - John who? John Hanson, was the first President of The United States. There was also a U.S. stamp made in his honor.
The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation. This document was actually proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Once the signing took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country.
John Hanson, was chosen unanimously by Congress (which included George Washington). In fact, all the other potential candidates refused to run against him, as he was a major player in the revolution and an extremely influential member of Congress. As the first President, Hanson had quite the shoes to fill. No one had ever been President and the role was poorly defined. His actions in office would set precedent for all future Presidents. He took office just as the Revolutionary War ended. Almost immediately, the troops demanded to be paid. As would be expected after any long war, there were no funds to meet the salaries. As a result, the soldiers threatened to overthrow the new government and put Washington on the throne as a monarch. All the members of Congress ran for their lives, leaving Hanson as the only guy left running the government. He somehow managed to calm the troops down and hold the country together. If he had failed, the government would have fallen almost immediately and everyone would have been bowing to King Washington. Hanson, as President, ordered all foreign troops off American soil, as well as the removal of all foreign flags. This was quite the feat, considering the fact that so many European countries had a stake in the United States since the days following Columbus. Hanson established the Great Seal of the United States, which all Presidents have since been required to use on all official documents. President Hanson also established the first Treasury Department, the first Secretary of War, and the first Foreign Affairs Department. The Articles of Confederation only allowed a President to serve a one year term during any three year period, so Hanson actually accomplished quite a bit in such little time.
Seven other presidents were elected after him:
1. John Hanson
2. Elias Boudinot (1782-83)
3. Thomas Mifflin (1783-84)
4. Richard Henry Lee (1784-85)
5. John Hancock (1785-86)
6. Nathan Gorman (1786-87)
7. Arthur St. Clair (1787-88)
8. Cyrus Griffin (1788-89),
...all served prior to George Washington ever taking office. So what happened? Why don't we hear about the first eight presidents? It's quite simple - The Articles of Confederation didn't work well. The individual states had too much power and nothing could be agreed upon. A new doctrine needed to be written - something we know as the Constitution. And that leads us to the end of our story. George Washington definitely was not the first President of the United States. He was the first President of the United States under the Constitution we follow today. And the first eight Presidents have been forgotten in history.
Fascinating facts! Thank you!
 

Luckytrim

Grill Master
Gold Site Supporter
Track Layout for the early Daytona Races...

The course started on the pavement of highway A1A (at 4511 South Atlantic Avenue, Ponce Inlet 29.108890°N 80.943669°W). A restaurant named "Racing's North Turn" now stands at that location. It went south 2 mi (3.2 km) parallel to the ocean on A1A (S. Atlantic Ave) to the end of the road, where the drivers accessed the beach at the south turn at the Beach Street approach 29.084705°N 80.925566°W, returned 2 miles (3.2 km) north on the sandy beach surface, and returned to A1A at the north turn.

1.jpg
 

Luckytrim

Grill Master
Gold Site Supporter
Baby carrots are just pieces of a fully-grown, regular adult carrot, cut into two-inch fragments by a machine.
Once cut up, another machine rounds off the edges, so that the carrots end up looking like the ones you buy at the grocery store. The shredded leftovers usually end up in cattle feed.
Why not just use actual baby carrots? Real baby carrots aren't very tasty, and are often too thin and flimsy to pack a real crunch.

 

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
Gold Site Supporter
Baby carrots are just pieces of a fully-grown, regular adult carrot, cut into two-inch fragments by a machine.
Once cut up, another machine rounds off the edges, so that the carrots end up looking like the ones you buy at the grocery store. The shredded leftovers usually end up in cattle feed.
Why not just use actual baby carrots? Real baby carrots aren't very tasty, and are often too thin and flimsy to pack a real crunch.


This one I did know, for a change. As such, I almost never buy "baby carrots".

Lee
 
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