Rumors from the Web...Steak tenderizing with onion

Luckytrim

Grill Master
Gold Site Supporter
I read this on FB today - Any thoughts ?

"If you want to make that New York strip or sirloin steak succulent and juicy, then you might want to consider a tenderizer before cooking. Although it can make steak more tender, you can put away that powdered meat tenderizer you bought from the spices aisle. Instead, all you need for a juicy steak is an onion, which acts as a natural tenderizer while also adding a boost of flavor to your meal.
Simply dice up your onion into small pieces and mix it with some salt. Add the mixture to your steak before cooking, and let the meat sit in the onion juices for at least 30 minutes to an hour. In Japan, the technique is traditionally used for Chaliapin steak, which also involves scoring and pounding the beef with a mallet before coating it in raw onion prior to cooking. The pungent vegetable softens the meat to where you can tear it apart with your fingers — no knife needed.

If you've already got a marinade in mind for your steak, try adding some raw onion to the mix as well. It will have the same effect as if you were just using onion by itself."
 

Sass Muffin

Coffee Queen ☕
Gold Site Supporter
This worked beautifully, I did not have to score or pound the steak at all, I did poke it a bit with a knife after adding the onion and salt mixture.
It's a keeper 😊
 

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
Gold Site Supporter
It was my turn to try this on my strip steak.

I read about the Chaliapin steak, so I grated the onion and lightly scored the steak, but didn't pound it. Left it for 30 minutes, scraped off the onion, patted a bit dry, heated up a cast iron pan, a T. of oil, cooked for 2 minutes a side. Let rest 10 minutes.

Well, it was a thin steak, but it was tender, done medium. Nothing much different in tenderness. I was disappointed that it didn't brown as well as it usually does. I ate half - might make a cheesesteak sandwich with the other half on Saturday.

The salad was wonderful, LOL!

:Lee

onion steak.jpeg


onion steak plated.jpeg
 

SilverSage

Resident Crone
It was my turn to try this on my strip steak.

I read about the Chaliapin steak, so I grated the onion and lightly scored the steak, but didn't pound it. Left it for 30 minutes, scraped off the onion, patted a bit dry, heated up a cast iron pan, a T. of oil, cooked for 2 minutes a side. Let rest 10 minutes.

Well, it was a thin steak, but it was tender, done medium. Nothing much different in tenderness. I was disappointed that it didn't brown as well as it usually does. I ate half - might make a cheesesteak sandwich with the other half on Saturday.

The salad was wonderful, LOL!

:Lee

View attachment 63804

View attachment 63805
The onion would make it wet, and wet food doesn't brown. I'm sure you knew to pat it dry first. But this is basically a brine, and wet brined foods don't brown well. There has been a big movement away from wet brining, toward dry brining for this reason.
 

Sass Muffin

Coffee Queen ☕
Gold Site Supporter
I didn't saturate either one of the two strip steaks I made last week.
I simply mixed chopped onion with enough salt to tell it was there - before rubbing both into the top surface.
I also pan fried mine in butter for about 3 minutes per side.
 
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