Restoring Cast Iron stuff!!

Fe Stomach

New member
Thanks for the encouragement Leni, I hope it looks good and turns out good food too.
And yep, it sure will be a cutey when it's done......I hope.

Here are photos of the 10" lodge skillet. I sand blasted half of it inside and out, then I used the wire brush on the outside.
The photo of the inside is half sand blasted, half untouched.
The photo of the outside is half sand blasted, half wire brushed.

I was going to season the pan with half sand blasted and half wire brushed, but looking at the photo of the bottom of the pan.....that would look kinda stupid.

My intent was to have a comparison down the road.

So, I will sand blast the complete pan, and only use the wire brush on the DO. We can then somewhat compare each to the other.
 

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Fe Stomach

New member
Stripping the DO posed a different problem. The coating on the inside was thicker and softer. I actually started with a razor blade/paint scraper. Then I just used a wire brush to knock it all down. This didn't remove the nice patina from the pot like the sandblasting did to the 10 inch pan.

I took these picks some of which show the wire brushing half done for comparison, but I did wire brush the whole thing including the lid.
To bad the second pic is out of focus, it actually show about a 2" chunk peeling off.
 

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Fe Stomach

New member
The 10 inch skillet came out looking real nice I thought. The only place that I read anything about sandblasting was a site recommended by Sass Muffin called the panman, their only complaint was it destroyed the color which affected the 'value' as a collector. And it did!! You can see it's more grey than black. But I don't think that I care about the color, I was more concerned about the hubby of the lady I got it from, having melted lead in it, or washing parts in it!! So, down to bare metal it went.
My thought it restored the value as a Cast Iron Skillet.

I seasoned it with Wesson vegetable oil. Two cookings, first one was done outdoors in the BBq grill. I cleaned the pan, oiled her down good then cooked it for an hour....oh boy, did it smoke!!! :weber:

I then backed the the temp down in steps, removed it, re-oiled it and the stuffed it in the wall oven in the house, 500 degrees for on hour, man did she get hot.....when she came home and the house was full of smoke!!

But I think the pan cam out real fine. I again backed the temp down in stages, put it on the grill grate and oiled her down good again.
The site mentioned by bigjim, wag-society, suggested that when re-seasoning, to oil it while your iron is hot, that way as it cools it sucks the oil into the open pores...,.,.so I did.
 

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Fe Stomach

New member
Thanks SilverSage, I've probably made this project messier than necessary...LOL

Next, I oiled up the DO and DO lid using the same process as with the skillet. The only difference, of course, I did not sand blast, I just scraped and wire brushed.

The DO went into the BBq grill, upside down. But the lid I had to do right side up as it is bowl shaped on the inside and I was afraid of problems if the dish shape collected and burned the oil excessively. And, as you can see on the lid, oil concentrated around the rim. There it bubbled and burned. Being on the outside it only will look ugly and shouldn't affect preformance. The bubble looked like a marshmellow when it has caught on fire then leaves a black thin shell. That black shell is what you see in the pic around the rim.
(The lid actually went into the grill with the skillet. It would not fit in the grill on top of the DO)

After it smoked on the BBq grill, I again stepped down the temp, and removed it from the grill. When these came out of the grill they were very black and very dry, but not as sooty as I would expect. The lid apparently collected enough oil that it never did cook completly "dry" on the top.???


Oiled them up with vegetable oil again, then 500 degrees in the wall oven for and hour......came our real purty!!!

DONE!!! (done with the beginning)
Next is learning how to store and maintain this good stuff and the hard work put into it.
:bbq3:
 

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ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
as you discovered in the sand blasting, black is not the natural color of "cast iron" - it's often called gray iron in the primary metals world.

nice job cleaning them up & seasoning - they sure look good!
 

Guts

New member
Leni I use the melt lead in cast iron pot and ladle out amounts to sinker molds for fishing. Now I have a smelting pot that pours out of the bottom for doing this but that was the old way I did when I was a kid. It's also a good way to melt down tire weights for lead the steel that clips on the rim just floats on top of the lead. Any scoop it off, then to clean the lead you put a couple drops of motor oil on it in all the impurities come to the top and you just ladle it off. I just made some large deep-sea fishing weights a couple months ago. But that is the way I used to do it in a cast-iron pot.
 

Fe Stomach

New member
Why on earth was he melting lead in it?

Leni:
I don't know that he was, but it's not uncommon to use cast iron in foundry work as it has a very high melting temp.
And it was in the garage.
So to be safe.....

Speaking of lead, I need to get back to my still........:yum::yum::yum::margarita:
 

Mr. Green Jeans

New member
FYI as DW is a chemistry teacher melting point of lead: 621 F, cast iron 2300F.

Now for seasoning, I go back way back to my days as a tenderfoot scout. One of our troop leaders was a die hard DO chef. He seasoned a DO with a block of lard. Placed the DO on coals, top and bottom and let it cook until the fire was out.
 

Fe Stomach

New member
I read that in some of the articles and I chose vegetable oil as most said that animal fats go rancid quicker than vegetable oils.
If it is used often enough it shouldn't be a problem, but our DO is apt to end up in storage during our long winter.
And I got a good snoot full of that smell when I opened the little DO in the photos.:sick:

Even found one site, I believe melindalee, that suggested that for long term storage to use mineral oil to coat just before storing, as the mineral oil would not go rancid at all....Is that true? Not for seasoning, but as a single coating prior to storage.


sounds like the scout leader was an old hand and knew what he was doing, and probably used the DO often enough that rancid was not an issue.

I also read that using vegetable oils left the surface 'tacky' instead of....

Anyone else got hints/answers based on experience re; animal vs vegetable and long term storage using mineral oil?
 

ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
>>oil/fat for seasoning CI

that's one of those long debated issues (g)

it is true that mineral oil does not go rancid or 'spoil'

on the "it gets sticky" bit, both vegetable & animal fats contain lecithin - and that's the alleged culprit in creating a sticky residue. obviously specific fats contain more or less - and some stuff like the spray on no-stick products contain artificially high levels of lecithin - used as an 'emulsifier' in that product.

if you've ever seen a non-stick pan with a non-removable brown coating - that's often blamed on use of spray on products with the lecithin.

I've never found a good info source of "fat X" contains Y% of (naturally occurring) lecithin for comparison - and it seems some folks use vegetable oil while others prefer lard for seasoning and I've also never seen a definitive scientific explanation of why one should work better than the other.
 

Leni

New member
Melinda never uses anything but mineral oil on her cast iron. I disagree with that as does Cast Iron Jack who has a teaching segment on her website. In the olden days the only fat available was animal fat and that's what I use. I use my cast iron every day so going rancid is not a problem. They don't get sticky either. I rinse with hot water and then dry with a paper towel.
 

Fe Stomach

New member
Ya know, that kinda makes sense, not using the mineral oil. I believe that it is used as a laxative, or I think that is what my mom used to use on us.
My wife suggest that if I don't use the DO enough in the winter...then I should use it more often.
( I just hate it when she makes so much sence in such a short sentence!!) :in_love:
 

loboloco

Member
Anybody who wants a C.I frying pan, or pone pans send me a P.M. I have a friend running a secondhand store that will let me buy them cheap. Remember, I will need to charge for shipping and my costs, so let me know what you are willing to pay. I won't charge to make a profit, but I can't afford to ship skillets all over the country either.
 

bigjim

Mess Cook
Super Site Supporter
Leni:
I don't know that he was, but it's not uncommon to use cast iron in foundry work as it has a very high melting temp.
And it was in the garage.
So to be safe.....

Speaking of lead, I need to get back to my still........:yum::yum::yum::margarita:
My dad had a little 6 inch or so 3 legged cast iron pot (w/lid) sitting on top of the wood stove in his shop for years. He used it for hide glue. This is the reason that I always strip new old cast iron to bare metal and start over. You never know what the last use of the CI was.

Wish I still had that pot, I have never seen anything like it.
 

Fe Stomach

New member
Anybody who wants a C.I frying pan, or pone pans send me a P.M. I have a friend running a secondhand store that will let me buy them cheap. Remember, I will need to charge for shipping and my costs, so let me know what you are willing to pay. I won't charge to make a profit, but I can't afford to ship skillets all over the country either.
What part of the country are you in? I'm kinda interested in a miniature DO, 4 or 5 inch. I think it'll fit in a post office flat rate box.

Pone?
 

lilbopeep

☃️❄️ Still trying to get it right.
Site Supporter
What part of the country are you in? I'm kinda interested in a miniature DO, 4 or 5 inch. I think it'll fit in a post office flat rate box.

Pone?
Pone pan is the corn shape mold to make corn bread "sticks"
 

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