I bought a jar of Nutritional yeast! Any fans?

chocolate moose

New member
Super Site Supporter
I've never tasted it but I've heard good things about it. I want to put it on popcorn but I'm not sure what else.

Anyone have ideas?
 

ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
uhmmm, errrr, what's up widt'dat, Doc?

yeast is a bacteria. it exists everywhere everywhere...
strain X, strain Y, good yeast, bad yeast, so-so yeast.

"nutritional yeast" sounds like ueber ultra super hype hype $300/ ounce type of stuff.

the human "gut" (i.e. digestive tract) needs all kinds of yeasts and bacteria. all of which, despite the tv claims, are rather easily acquired.

so what do you figger this stuff is gonna' do for you?
 

chocolate moose

New member
Super Site Supporter
I figure it's going to be delicious on popcorn, then I figured I'd ask around for other idea as to what to do with it, as it's a big jar. Woud u like some?
 

PanchoHambre

New member
They sell it at my co-op I have not tried it but basically what i am told is you can use it as a general flavor enhancer - sort of like natural MSG
 

luvs

'lil Chef
Gold Site Supporter
there is some debate, although i hear marmite & vegemite resemble nutritional yeast rather closely. 1 difference is, those're of a paste-form, tho. both nutritional yeast & marm/vege-mite have b-vitamins, & were derived via brewing alcohol. so much saltiness, a richness, & i find both to be delicious on buttered toast, in soups, sauces, plain beef gravies, beef w/ gravies, & so on.
let us know if u buy yeast!
 

larry_stewart

New member
They often use it in ' vegan diets' to kind of give something that 'cheese taste'.
Honestly, I dont even see how it resembles a cheese like taste. Its more of a yeasty, slightly bitter taste. Nutritional, it is, I cant argue that. Most the times I use a recipe that calls for it, I actually leave it out, cause I feel it takes away from the dish, more than it adds to it. For lack of a better description, I think it kind of adds that ' umami' quality to the food it is added too.
 

Shermie

Well-known member
Site Supporter
This might be different from the yeast that I've used in the past, but the only things I've used yeast for was for making bread and beer.
 

ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
>>used yeast for was for making bread and beer
you've been missed by the health nut marketeers.

yeast is a simply organism that eats sugar(s) and farts carbon dioxide.
that's the simple bit. it's actually not exactly so simple.

but heh, in a 128 character Tweet, who has the space to explain?

I learned, while living in Germany
- home of a few good breads . . . -
eating (a lot of) yeasty smelling bread hot out of the oven could make your tummy go wonkers.

been there, done that, proved the concept multiple times.

now . . . yeast "itself" is killed at bread baking temperatures.
CO2 generally doesn't make you hurl.
so there's some other factor to yeast that can/might/will make a body uncomfortable.

sprinkling "raw" yeast on my food?
to what purpose and end?
yeast does not "do it's thing" until it is "activated" by water and in an environment that it can grow and multiple.

yeast from Egyptian tombs has been cultivated to make gosh darn real historically-yeast-correct Egyptian beer. yeast is rather a bit tolerant to freeze-dry, dessert-dry, centuries-dried,,,,,, conditions. add a bit of water, "I'm BAAAACCCK!"

any of that gonna' happen by sprinkling dry dormant yeast dust on your food?
 

luvs

'lil Chef
Gold Site Supporter
i checked w/ the pros. it's essentially intended not as a nutritional item, & rather as a 'cheese-type' add-in to enhance a food's natural qualities, & is nothing close to bread yeast. she was blatant & clear on that one.
 

Shermie

Well-known member
Site Supporter
>>used yeast for was for making bread and beer
you've been missed by the health nut marketeers.

yeast is a simply organism that eats sugar(s) and farts carbon dioxide.
that's the simple bit. it's actually not exactly so simple.

but heh, in a 128 character Tweet, who has the space to explain?

I learned, while living in Germany
- home of a few good breads . . . -
eating (a lot of) yeasty smelling bread hot out of the oven could make your tummy go wonkers.

been there, done that, proved the concept multiple times.

now . . . yeast "itself" is killed at bread baking temperatures.
CO2 generally doesn't make you hurl.
so there's some other factor to yeast that can/might/will make a body uncomfortable.

sprinkling "raw" yeast on my food?
to what purpose and end?
yeast does not "do it's thing" until it is "activated" by water and in an environment that it can grow and multiple.

yeast from Egyptian tombs has been cultivated to make gosh darn real historically-yeast-correct Egyptian beer. yeast is rather a bit tolerant to freeze-dry, dessert-dry, centuries-dried,,,,,, conditions. add a bit of water, "I'm BAAAACCCK!"

any of that gonna' happen by sprinkling dry dormant yeast dust on your food?



Yeah, in bread making, the thing to do is to test the yeast with sugar to make sure that it is alive. If the yeast is no good, it won't foam at the top of the water. Toss it and use a fresher one without an expired date.

I once made that mistake, and the dough did not rise at all! had to toss it out. The next day, I tried it again, but with fresher yeast, and it worked. :ohmy:
 

lilbopeep

☃️❄️ Still trying to get it right.
Site Supporter
When I was a kid my mom was very health conscious. We ate a lot of organic and natural foods (most of the organic veggies she grew). She followed Dr. Carlton Fredericks also met him at a book signing and spoke to him on his nightly radio shows (WOR NY AM radio).

We would take brewers yeast pills and they did have health benefits. BTW even The cats liked them :ohmy:


Here is some info I found on it:

What Is Brewer's Yeast?

Brewer's yeast is a byproduct of the beer industry. It absorbs vitamins and nutrients from the other ingredients involved in the brewing process. As the yeast absorbs nutrients it also absorbs flavors, which are often bitter. Some companies use a process to remove the bitterness from the product but often this also removes some of the nutritional content. In fact, during this process nearly all of the chromium will be removed. If you choose to use this type of brewer's yeast, you should add a chromium supplement.
Ingredients that are utilized in the brewing process are:

  • Hops
  • Grain
  • Malt
Brewer's yeast is found in health food and natural food stores. There is no way to know the exact nutritional content in any brewer's yeast because it will vary according to the age of the yeast and even from batch to batch.

Nutritional Content

Brewer's yeast has a high nucleic acid count. This is an important component of cell development. Other vitamins and minerals contained in brewer's yeast are:


  • Folic acid
  • B12
  • Potassium
  • Thiamin
  • Niacin
  • Chromium
It is low in calories, fat, sodium and carbohydrates, which makes it great for the person who has dietary restrictions for health reasons.
Some Health Benefits of Brewer's Yeast

Using brewer's yeast daily as a supplement to your healthy diet can improve the following conditions:

  • Diabetes
  • Hypoglycemia
  • High cholesterol
  • Eczema
  • Nervousness
  • Stress
  • Carpal tunnel
  • Anemia
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation
  • Repels fleas when given to household pets
If you use brewer's yeast to help control diabetes, be sure you get the type that has not gone through the debittering process. The nutrient in the yeast that helps with diabetes is chromium, the supplement that is removed during debittering. Chromium is also the part of the yeast that helps lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and raise HDL (good) cholesterol. The chromium in brewer's yeast is more bio-available, allowing the body to use it more effectively than the type found in supplements.

Side Effects and Cautions

Always consult with your health care provider before taking any new supplements, including brewer's yeast. This is especially true if you have diabetes or hypoglycemia. Brewer's yeast can change the way your body responds to blood sugar and this can be dangerous if you are on insulin or other similar medications.
Brewer's yeast has no serious side effects, but it can cause stomach upset, gas, and/or bloating in some people. Always start slow when adding a nutritional supplement to your diet, gradually increasing the amount over a period of weeks to give you body time to adjust.
Do not use brewer's yeast if you have the following conditions:

  • Gout
  • Candida
  • High levels of uric acid
  • Allergy to mold or penicillin
Taking Brewer's Yeast

Brewer's yeast is usually sold in flaked or powdered form. It has a yeasty, almost cheesy flavor and is an easy addition to savory dishes. Sprinkle it on popcorn or salads. In fact, you can add it to almost any dish, including:

  • Meatloaf
  • Stews
  • Pasta dishes
  • Rice
  • Potatoes au Gratin
The yeast is best sprinkled over the cooked food or stirred in at the end. This is because the cooking process can destroy the B vitamins.
Keep a close eye on your health. If you experience any unusual symptoms, then you may be sensitive to the yeast. This is especially true if you have a tendency to have yeast infections. If you have no added symptoms and if you feel better, then continue to increase the brewer's yeast in your diet.
The health benefits of brewer's yeast are a blessing to many people. By supplementing your diet with this product you may find that not only does your energy increase, but your metabolism works better, too. You just feel better overall. Give yourself some time to get used to the flavor, and you may find you eventually like the taste. Brewer's yeast is an easy way to add powerful nutrients to your healthy diet.

http://vitamins.lovetoknow.com/Health_Benefits_of_Brewers_Yeast
 

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