My Grits

LADawg

New member
As some of us down here in the south say, “Grits is groceries”.
I’ve been cooking grits this way for several years now and they are very, very, good!

GRITS FOR TWO
1 ½ Cups Water
1 Envelope Gayo Ham Seasoning
Salt to taste, use with caution since the ham seasoning has salt in it
1/3 Cup Grits, regular kind, not instance grits
½ Teaspoon Sweet Basil, dried

Place Water in a medium sized sauce pan, add Ham Seasoning and Salt. Stir to mix and bring to a Water to a boil. Stir in the Grits, and cook for about 3 minutes, while stirring occasional. Add Basil and cook for an additional 2 or 3 minutes or until the Grits have reached the desired thickness.
Serve hot with a teaspoon or two of Butter.

Notes: 1. Grated Cheddar or Parmesan Cheese may be added if desired.
IZE="3"][/SIZE]
 

ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
grits be good! for two I use
55 grams grits
375 grams water
the measuring cup is a pain for small qtys (g)

do you do green beans southern style? cut, in "juice," cooked slowly until they fall apart? DW's been after me about those . . . it's the juice&seasoning bit I'm missing.
 

lilbopeep

Still trying to get it right.
Site Supporter
grits be good! for two I use
55 grams grits
375 grams water
the measuring cup is a pain for small qtys (g)

do you do green beans southern style? cut, in "juice," cooked slowly until they fall apart? DW's been after me about those . . . it's the juice&seasoning bit I'm missing.

Are you using canned green beans? Is the liquid in the can the "juice" or am I miss reading this.


BTW I love grits! I can't thinking of "My cousin Vinny" when I order them at cracker barrel or IHOP. LOL
 

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
Gold Site Supporter

ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
dunno. these were cut about 3" long - I took particular note the bean seed themselves were small - ie either by variety or immature.

they had been cooked to the point (some) pods were falling apart.

the juice - that's my question. water plays a big part (g)
I think I detected some vinegar / sour / tartness
it seems there was some oil/fat - but there was no bacon chunks/bits in sight....
 

LADawg

New member
No, not wheat, but corn.
The most common brands are Quaker and Jim Dandy. I prefer the old fashion type but they also come in the instant form.
Lots of places up north that you can't find them. That just means there are more of them for us down here in the south.
 

Johnny West

Well-known member
I got a taste for grits in the army.

With Quaker Oats being in my home, you'd think they'd be more popular in Iowa.
 

LADawg

New member
I got a taste for grits in the army.

With Quaker Oats being in my home, you'd think they'd be more popular in Iowa.

I , never ate any grits when I was in the army, but I did have some potatoes for breakfast for the FIRST time in my life. I grew up in a couple of small towns in Mississippi and had never seen hash browns for breakfast. I just stopped to think about it and I don't ever remember eating breakfast anywhere but at home and all we ever had was grits, never potatoes.
Now in the South you get your choice of grits or potatoes if you are eating breakfast in a café.
 

Johnny West

Well-known member
I thought hominy was grits? I'll have to google it. :readytoeat:

About the only time we had fried potatoes, growing up, was weekends or at "supper" time. It was a treat to go to a cafe for hamburger steak and fried potatoes.
 

ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
it's corn, but not ground, more like popcorn in size/structure.

it's confusing because one often heard "hominy grits" . . . which was ground up dry hominy.
 

Johnny West

Well-known member
I was in Winco yesterday and all they had was instant and passed.
I'll check the commissary next trip. I'll make some next week.
I picked up some Albers corn meal, too.

I spent a lot of time at Ft. Benning and Ft. Bragg and they always had grits. Ft. Lewis, too.

The diners in Utah all have them, too.
 
Top