ISO Advice - Mini cheesecake cracked

lilbopeep

❄️☃️❄️ Still trying to get it right.
Site Supporter
DD wants to gift mini cheesecakes for Christmas. We did a test run and they came out cracked. When I use my full-size springform pan for cheesecake I place it in a water bath to bake. The cake doesn't crack.
The problem is that the mini pan has removable bottoms and I'm afraid the water will get in the pan if I place it in a water bath.
I baked them at 350 °F for 20 minutes. Then turned off the oven and left the pan in the oven without opening the door for another 20 minutes.
Any advice would be appreciated.

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SilverSage

Resident Crone
Couldn't you create steam by putting a pan of boiling water on the rack below the muffin pan?
Also, the purpose of the water bath is to cook it more gently. Sometimes on smaller pans you have to reduce the temperature a bit so it cooks more gently.
 

lilbopeep

❄️☃️❄️ Still trying to get it right.
Site Supporter
Couldn't you create steam by putting a pan of boiling water on the rack below the muffin pan?
Also, the purpose of the water bath is to cook it more gently. Sometimes on smaller pans you have to reduce the temperature a bit so it cooks more gently.
What temperature and how long would you recommend?
 

SilverSage

Resident Crone
I'd try just dropping it to 325 to start to see how that works. Remember an oven never actually holds a constant temp. It cycles up and down 25 or more degrees in each direction. So setting it at 350 really means it is cycling between 325-375 at times. The purpose of the water bath is to hold the actual pan temp more constant, since the water won't change as quickly. 375 is probably way too hot for those minis.

If you drop it to 325, the range will be closer to 300-350, which is the max temp you would want.

Another option, which I often do with a springform pan, is to set the pan itself on aluminum foil and bring the edges up around the sides of the pan. Then set the whole thing in a water bath. That will give you the same effect, but with the added insurance of the foil.
 

medtran49

Well-known member
Gold Site Supporter
I usually just put a loaf pan full of water in the oven when baking cheesecake. That keeps the environment moist without the water seepage issue. You can also set the cheesecake pan on a sheet pan and that will diffuse the heat some.

Cheesecakes can also Crack because of overmixing and overbaking so make sure you aren't doing either. 40 minutes seems like a long time for something that size (cupcake size from the looks of it?).
 

lilbopeep

❄️☃️❄️ Still trying to get it right.
Site Supporter
I usually just put a loaf pan full of water in the oven when baking cheesecake. That keeps the environment moist without the water seepage issue. You can also set the cheesecake pan on a sheet pan and that will diffuse the heat some.

Cheesecakes can also Crack because of overmixing and overbaking so make sure you aren't doing either. 40 minutes seems like a long time for something that size (cupcake size from the looks of it?).
Maybe half the time? 10 minutes bake and 10 minutes resting with oven off? Same oven temp?
 

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
Gold Site Supporter
use boiling hot water for the water bath - if it does leak a little into the cups, the boiling water will cook the immediately adjacent batter and 'seal' the leak.

Chowder, you rascal, good to see you!

Lee
 
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