Chef Paul Prudhomme's red beans and rice

medtran49

Well-known member
The original recipe, as you can see, calls for a pound of red beans. Most packages are about 12 ounces now unless you get the huge package. I just use the 12 ounces in the recipe.



I've made this in the pressure cooker the last few times I've made it. I'll get the book out later and add the pressure cooker times as the only notes on that are in the book itself.



1 lb dried red kidney beans
water, to cover the beans and cook them in
2-3 ham hocks
2 1⁄2 cups celery, finely chopped
2 cups onions, finely chopped
2 cups green bell peppers, finely chopped

5 bay leaves
2 teaspoons white pepper
2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves
1-1⁄2 teaspoons garlic powder
1-1⁄2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves
1 teaspoon cayenne
1⁄2 teaspoon black pepper

1 tablespoon Tabasco or Crystal sauce
1 lb andouille sausage, cut diagonally into 3/4-inch pieces

Rinse the beans and quickly look through to make sure there isn't something in them there shouldn't be. Soak overnight in a large bowl with water covering by at least an inch or so. Drain beans just before using.

In a very large saucepan or dutch oven, place the ham hocks, 8 cups of water, celery, onions, bell peppers, bay leaves, and seasonings, cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until ham hocks are tender. Remove ham hocks and set aside. Add the drained beans to the pan and bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasinally, adding water as necessary. Cook another 30 minutes stirring frequently and adding water as necessary. You want to keep the mixture kind of soupy but not watery. Stir in the andouille and continue simmering until the beans start breaking up, about 35 minutes, stirring and scraping the bottom of the pan fairly often.

After the ham hocks have cooled, pick the good meat out and dice or tear into small 1/4 inch-ish pieces, discarding the skin and fat. Add the ham hock meat, hot sauce, and the andouille to the pot, stir and cook for 10 minutes more.
 

lilbopeep

Still trying to get it right.
Med. Have you had a chance to find the pressure cooker instructions?
What does andouille sausage taste like (ie - is it spicy)? DD doesn’t like spicy. Can I leave it out or use something else?
 

medtran49

Well-known member
I actually forgot. I'll do it later, need to actually do some work. If I forget again, don't hesitate to remind.


Yes, andouille is a bit spicy. There's a brand in the grocery, I think it's Ragin Cajun or something similar that's fairly mild. We tried it once when we happened to be out of our homemade. You could also probably sub kielbasa. Andouille is smoked so most of the grease is already gone, so I would cook the kielbasa, probably the Ragin Cajun some too to get rid of the excess grease that will come out. Since we make our own, we have enough fat in it for it to taste good, but not enough for it to be overly greasy like most commercially made sausages like that are.
 

lilbopeep

Still trying to get it right.
Thank you Med.
I have another question if I can’t find smoked ham hocks could I sub smoked pork chops (the good butcher case bone in kind not that vacuum sealed boneless junk) or smoked turkey (necks?)?
 

medtran49

Well-known member
I've used the smoked pork chops you are talking about when we couldn't find ham hocks years back.
 

medtran49

Well-known member
Using a stovetop pressure cooker on high, with quick cool downs with cool running water in sink:



15 minutes for ham hocks, seasoning and vege mix.



20 minutes with addition of beans.



15 minutes after removing ham hocks and adding andouille


After the last PC cook, I stir in the chopped up ham hock pieces to warm through and serve.
 

lilbopeep

Still trying to get it right.
I've used the smoked pork chops you are talking about when we couldn't find ham hocks years back.
Thank you.

Can't wait to make this. BTW I will be using the Instant Pot. But I can convert your PC instructions by adding a few minutes to make up for lower pressure of electric PC.
 

lilbopeep

Still trying to get it right.
Using a stovetop pressure cooker on high, with quick cool downs with cool running water in sink:



15 minutes for ham hocks, seasoning and vege mix.



20 minutes with addition of beans.



15 minutes after removing ham hocks and adding andouille


After the last PC cook, I stir in the chopped up ham hock pieces to warm through and serve.
Thank you Med.
So do I read this correctly? The beans will only need a total of 35 minutes to cook (after the hocks cook)?
And you are using a quick pressure release after each cook time?
 

medtran49

Well-known member
Yes to all, but I always soak beans.

You may need to add salt after beans are cooked. Taste, add salt if needed, then cook for 5-10 minutes more to meld if you had to add salt.
 
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ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
I did that recipe overnight - i.e. no bean presoak, but a 2 hr simmer + cool.fridge + reheat for service next day. I like the longtimetakingapproach as it usually produces the best flavors. as I recall, didn't add any (additional) salt - the smoked hock/shank was obviously salty, and we're not real salt hounds anyway . . .
 

Sass Muffin

#coffeefreak
I'm on this one.
Especially for this fall.
I'll probably do it all day in crock pot.
With sausage and jowl bacon.
Yes indeed.

What's it yield, like 6-8 servings?
 

medtran49

Well-known member
I need to clarify pressure cooking instructions. Start out on high to get it up to pressure, then turn down as low as possible to keep it cooking at pressure for remainder of cooking time.

I managed to make an inedibly burnt tasting pot of beans yesterday, even though there was plenty of liquid in the pot, by not turning the heat down far enough. In the last cook, the beans on the bottom stuck and burned, and I guess the pressure forced the burned taste into everything.
 

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
I need to clarify pressure cooking instructions. Start out on high to get it up to pressure, then turn down as low as possible to keep it cooking at pressure for remainder of cooking time.

I managed to make an inedibly burnt tasting pot of beans yesterday, even though there was plenty of liquid in the pot, by not turning the heat down far enough. In the last cook, the beans on the bottom stuck and burned, and I guess the pressure forced the burned taste into everything.

Awww, that stinks, Karen!

Lee
 
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