Brined Roast Pork Loin

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
Gold Site Supporter
My last pork loin roast was a bit dry, so I decided to brine this one, using my favorite brine recipe (below).

Brined overnight, then dried it off, sprinkled with salt, pepper, and baking soda (to enhance browning).

Browned on all sides. Roasted at 350 to 145 degrees. Wish you could have seen the juiciness of this - the photo doesn't do it justice!

Lee

Brine, Garlic-Sage for Pork Chops

Brine:

1 quart water
¼ cup kosher salt
6T dark brown sugar
2 T sage leaves, packed
½ T juniper berries, crushed
1 clove garlic, crushed
½ teas ground black pepper

Two thick pork chops
1 T diced shallots
1 teas Dijon mustard
½ cup pork stock (or water)
1 T butter, softened
1. Combine all the brine ingredients in a large pot and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve the salt and sugar. Remove from the heat and allow to cool to room temperature. Place the brine in the refrigerator until it has chilled.
2. Add the pork chops to the brine and refrigerate for 2 hours. Remove the pork chops from the brine and refrigerate at least 1 hour or up to a day.
3. A half hour before cooking, remove the pork chops from the refrigerator.
4. In a skillet over high heat, melt the pork fat until hot. Sear the pork chops on each side until well browned, about 5 minutes per side or until the pork reaches an internal temperature 140ºF.
5. Remove the pork chops from the skillet and cover with aluminum foil.
6. Reduce the heat to medium and add the shallots. Cook for 1 minute or until the shallots are softened.
7. Stir in the dijon mustard then deglaze the pan with the pork stock. Bring to a boil and reduce until slightly thickened.
8. Remove from the heat and stir in the softened butter.
9. Serve the pork chop covered with the sauce.
Serves 2
 

Attachments

  • Pork loin.JPG
    Pork loin.JPG
    124.6 KB · Views: 119

ChowderMan

Pizza Chef
Super Site Supporter
nice - have you tried a roast with dark meat in it - comes from the loin end.

I do mine a bit slower - I wonder how a brine and low-slow would work out?
 

QSis

Grill Master
Staff member
Gold Site Supporter
nice - have you tried a roast with dark meat in it - comes from the loin end.

I do mine a bit slower - I wonder how a brine and low-slow would work out?


Brines are made for low and slow, CMan.

Isn't the darker pork meat from the butt and/or shoulder? I DO love that!

Lee
 
Top