Boston Baked Beans (Pressure Cooked).

Shermie

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Iingredients;

1 lb (16 oz or 2 cups) small white, navy or great northern beans.

1/3 1b diced salt pork or bacon.

3 T brown sugar.

3 or 4 T molasses.

1/2 tsp dry mustard.

2 or 3 T ketchup or BBQ sauce.

1 medium size onion, chopped.

4 or 5 cloves garlic, chopped.

Salt & ground black pepper to taste.

1/2 tsp Sylvia's Seasoning.

Water to cover (hot tap water).


Directions;

Pick over beans, emoving any stones and / or foreign meterial. Pour beans into pressure cooker. Add hot tap water to cover. Cover with pressure lid, secure and set pressure regulator. Turn on burner to high setting to get pressure obtained in cooker. Reduce heat to medium and flash-pressure-soak for about 5 minutes.

Turn off heat. Cool cooker at once. Pur beans out and re-rinse. Drain.

Meanwhile, cook diced salt pork or bacon in cooker until lightly browned. Add chopped onion & garlic. Pour soaked beans back into cooker. Add remaining ingredients. Use hot tap water again for beans, enough to cover.

Secure lid back on cooker, set pressure regulator and tun on heat to high and let pressure build up again. Cook beans for 45 to 50 minutes. Cool cooker at once. Remove lid.

Beans are done when tender. Skins on beans might be a tad tough. Do not be alramed, as this in normal. But beans should be done otherwise.

Enjoy!

This is my first time ever, making baked beans in a pressure cooker!!

Surprisingly, it was a great success, I might add, and I think I'll do it this way from now on!! Beats the other method of doing it in the oven, which is way to slow!! Saves a tremenous amount of time & work over the traditional method!!

But soaking & cooking times may vary.

The results should still be the same though.
 

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Shermie

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Thanx!

It is good! And it's not overly sweetened either.

I thought at first, that it was just a hoax, and that the beans were still going to be hard and unenjoyable, but I was wrong. I've done it in the oven many times before, and it didn't come out the way that I wanted it to, always being way too dark and still kind of hard!!

But THIS method is now proven to be the clear-cut winner!! I may NEVER go back to the old way of making Boston Baked Beans, simply because it takes way too long!!

And during the long enjoyable hot summer, this method will be a Godsend because it's one thing less that has to be cooked in the oven for dinner on the Fourth of July, or anytime during the summer when you want to make homemade baked beans!!

Prep time from start to finish is only about 90 minutes - vs. 8 hours in the oven! Including the soaking time!
 
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QSis

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Very similar to my recipe for BBB, Sherm, but I do mine in a beanpot in the oven.

I use 2 cups of water to start, and may have to add a little during the bake, but I like them thick.

If one reduced the water, would they still be okay in the pressure-cooker, you think?

Lee
 

Shermie

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Very similar to my recipe for BBB, Sherm, but I do mine in a beanpot in the oven.

I use 2 cups of water to start, and may have to add a little during the bake, but I like them thick.

If one reduced the water, would they still be okay in the pressure-cooker, you think?

Lee



Since the pressure cooker relies totally on high heat, intense or extreme pressurized steam and a temp of about 275 to 280 degrees to cook food, especially dried beans, there is a slight chance that the water could reduce and evaporate rather steadily. Mainly because as food cooks inside the cooker, it is practically a hermetically sealed pot except for the vent pipe and regulator, which is necessitated to allow some of the pressure and steam to escape.

The water level in the cooker was about half full, as you might have noticed in the 3rd pic. When done, as in the 4th pic, you've probably noticed that the water level looks as though it went down a little. The beans rhemselves have consumed about 1/4 of that water.

You said that you started off with 2 cups of water. I would tend to thinki that that amount would be too little water, since dried beans DO swell as they cook. But that's just me. Are you using the whole 1-lb bag of beans?

If you do it in the pressure cooker, the golden rule is not to fill the cooker with too much water, but at the same time, too little water is not good either, as the beans need enough water and room to expand as they cook.

The recipe says Water, but it's not telling you how much, except to recommend that you have the water level about 1 inch above the beans.

The manual says to pressure-flash-soak ALL dried beans, but when cooking pinto beans, I DONT soak them. After being picked and washed, they go right into the cooker. :good:
 
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QSis

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Sherm,

I soak, then boil the beans a bit before I bake them.

I am intrigued with your pressure cooker method, but the traditional oven-baked beans are something that I do every winter. I look forward to it.

Here's my recipe (well, my grandmother's recipe).

Lee

Boston Baked Beans

1 pound (2 cups) dry navy beans
2/3 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1/4 cup molasses
chunk of salt pork, large diced, about 1 inch
1 large onion, large diced

Place dry beans in a large saucepan or Dutch oven and soak beans overnight.

Drain and rinse. Cover again with water, and simmer gently on top of the stove till tender, about a half hour. Drain again. Put in beans in beanpot (or Dutch oven) with the diced onions and salt pork.

Mix the brown sugar, dry mustard, and molasses with two cups of water. Pour over the beans and mix in. Cover the pot and bake at 300* for about 5 hours, adding water if necessary. Stir every hour.

You can do this in a crock pot, too, for about 8 hours on low or 5 hours on high (crockpots vary, so check your manual).
 

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Shermie

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Looks good!!

Pretty much the same recipe. I added several more things to it though, such as more seasonings.

I have that same spoon rest, BTW.
 

Shermie

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Yes it is! The biggest one that I've seen so far.

I use mine a lot, including yesterday when I did the baked beans.

It's also great when you're making cake batter, where you can lay the silicone spatula down between mixer work bowl scrapings!!

I also have a smaller heavier stainless steel one, and one that's even heavier than that one! You can knock someone out with it if you hit them hard enough!!

Yeah, I'm feeling like a kid in a candy store with this new-found quicker way to do baked beans!! Incredibly fast! Can't wait til the Fourth of July!! I'll do some more like that.
 
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Shermie

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Yesterday, I cooked BBQ dinner at a friend's house.

I made my now-famous pressure-cooked Boston Baked Beans, brought them over and made some slow-cooked BBQ'd spare ribs (couldn't find the baby back ribs) in the oven, cole slaw and cornbread.

Everyone LOVED it!!! They just couldn't stop saying how good it was!!! It was actually a birthay dinner for a couple of friends. I made so much that there is STILL enough for them for dinner tonight!!
 

Mama

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That was really nice of you Shermie! I'm sure they appreciated it!
 

QSis

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Don't you just love it when you cook something that makes your friends think you're brilliant, Sherm?

Lee
 

Shermie

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Yes!All the time!!

Makes me feel real proud of myself that I'm able to bring happiness to others and make them think that I'm the best!!!
 

Shermie

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I've since cooked another rib dinner over at the same friend's house and had my brother and his fiance over!!

Mainly because he couldn't eat any of the first rib dinner on account he was competing in the Boston Marathon the next day. He couldn't have any heavy food in his stomach.

And yes, the dinner included my now-famous Boston Baked Beans - again cooked in the pressure cooker! I may NEVER go back to the traditional way of doing them!!!

This method is just too easy and convenient!!!!!
 

Shermie

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For those of you who might be vegetarians and don't want to use any meat with the beans, you can also do it vegetarian style. Just sautee the onions in a little oil and leave out the meat.
 

Shermie

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I'm going to make the same recipe when my nine-year-old great nephew comes up to visit me next summer!

He'll be flabergasted!! He likes to eat, cook and bake, so he'll be working with me in the kitchen. He'll LOVE it!! :cooking::eating2:
 

Shermie

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Very similar to my recipe for BBB, Sherm, but I do mine in a beanpot in the oven.

I use 2 cups of water to start, and may have to add a little during the bake, but I like them thick.

If one reduced the water, would they still be okay in the pressure-cooker, you think?

Lee



Supposedly, ALL THREE type of beans can be used, but I mainly prefer the Small White Beans over the other two.

Those seem to work the best! :eating2:
 
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