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Calicolady
02-03-2009, 12:32 PM
Who got you interested in food? And when and with what type(s)?

RobsanX
02-03-2009, 12:37 PM
My mom. Best cook in the world. She is from rural Oklahoma, and cooked with a Southern influence. Always simple, and always delicious!

PanchoHambre
02-03-2009, 12:45 PM
the great Aunt who watched me as a kid was one of those old-world Italian cooks so my love of food comes from her

Cooking... during college in Houston. 1. Houston had a great variety of restaurants and grocery shopping so there were all sorts of new foods to try (Mexican, Vietnamese, BBQ, Soul Food etc and eating out was cheap there so as students we got around . 2. My friends were from all over as well and we cooked for each other a lot sharing what we knew. This exchange continues still between us when we see each other

Cookware... my former roommate managed a specialty cookware store so we had everything and if we did not own it we had it for trial at somepoint.

but i don't know I really think I was born interested in food... always loved food and trying new food... which I think ultimately leads to wanting to be able to make it

joec
02-03-2009, 12:50 PM
My grandmother taught me a lot as a kid and hers are still the standard by which I judge my own foods. Once I got married she taught my wife much of what she knows knows as well.

Now to be honest I could cook for myself but my wife did most of the cooking the first decade we were married. Then I got laid up for awhile and couldn't work so she went back to work and I became Mr. Mom. This forced me to have to get into a into cooking on a regular bases with 4 kids at home. In those days PBS was all their was with cooking shows and I got into Martin Yan, Julia Child and Jeff Smith. Since those days my wife and I have been sharing the cooking requirements, as both of us like to cook. I also had my Grandmother living with us up until her death in '96 at 93, though she didn't cook she did taste our food and critique it. She could be a tough critic too.

My grandmother taught me Italian and Hungarian foods, while I learned Asian from Martin Yan. Child and Smith I mostly learned techniques, as well as some dishes.

Ronjohn
02-03-2009, 12:55 PM
My stomach. :)

I had always liked cooking a bit, but on about 4 days notice I went from being in Detroit, to living on my own in Dallas for work.

So that was when I got serious about learning to cook. And man, were there ever some mis-fires... :sick:

buckytom
02-03-2009, 01:00 PM
my belly; my mom; mrs. marchese, a childhood friend's mom; mrs. costanzo, my pseudo-adopted grandparent of an old gf; jimmy armstrong (R.I.P.), owner of a pub/restaurant across from my job; and joe from "joe's buon appetito", a local italian deli owner who's shop was near my first apartment.

but mostly my mom. :chef:

jim_slagle
02-03-2009, 01:04 PM
My mom. Best cook in the world. She is from rural Oklahoma, and cooked with a Southern influence. Always simple, and always delicious!

Same here, my Mom. Rural Texas with a little German influence, a little southern, along with tex-mex.

Lots of the recipes I've posted are hers.

Jim

BamsBBQ
02-03-2009, 01:09 PM
of course mom cuz my grandmother couldnt cook..lol

started one winter day when i was 8, i told mom i was hungry, she said go fry yourself an egg i went huh :shock:... she said if u can flip an egg without breaking it, u will be able to cook..

out came old cast iron pan(still my favorite), egg cooked,flipped,eaten and the rest is history..lol

Miniman
02-03-2009, 01:09 PM
Eating got me into food.:D:D

Seriously, though, mum had me cooking from about age 10. I just enjoy the results and playing with different ways of doing food. It's also cheaper to make ratyher than buy.

Constance
02-03-2009, 01:17 PM
It was mostly my maternal grandmother who got me interested in cooking, because I always liked hanging out in the kitchen with her. She always found some little job to keep me busy and make me feel important.
My mom found day to day cooking boring, and spent as little time on it as possible, but she enjoyed special "projects", like cookies, pies and fancy cakes. I got to help with the cookies and pies, but when she started decorating a cake, I was run out of the kitchen so she could concentrate.

RobsanX
02-03-2009, 01:22 PM
I should be fair and give a shout out to my dad too. He taught me how to grill which is the type of cooking I love the most!

lilylove
02-03-2009, 01:24 PM
I've always liked to eat... but I started cooking after hearing Paul tell his mom ( before we were married) that he was going to have to do all the cooking because I didn't know how to cook. I thought I could. Now most of the family likes the way I cook her dishes better than she does! lol. I've come a long way baby!!

RobsanX
02-03-2009, 01:30 PM
I've always liked to eat... but I started cooking after hearing Paul tell his mom ( before we were married) that he was going to have to do all the cooking because I didn't know how to cook. I thought I could. Now most of the family likes the way I cook her dishes better than she does! lol. I've come a long way baby!!

I think you got tricked. DW had no problem passing me the apron! :lol:

FooD
02-03-2009, 01:35 PM
Playing with fire outdoors as a kid.

The Tourist
02-03-2009, 01:36 PM
Rubbing elbows with professionals.

When I return a knife to a trained professional and watch him chop and slice at incredible speed, I think it's like watching a ballet.

We have a restaurant here called the Ginza of Tokyo where chefs prepare "dinner in the round" from a grill surrounded by the diners.

I always take a freshly sharpened gyuto.

If that doesn't get your heart pumping, nothing will.

Calicolady
02-03-2009, 01:37 PM
i think you got tricked. Dw had no problem passing me the apron! :lol:

lol!

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 01:42 PM
A friend, who is a fantastic cook, took me under her wing and convinced me I could learn to cook a decent meal. I really believed it was just something that came naturally or not at all. I cooked everyday since I had kids, but it really was awful. Probably the only reason my kids and I are so healthy is because I always kept a lot of fresh, raw fruits and veggies on hand. That was reliably good, whereas anything I "cooked" was a crap-shoot at best.

Sooo, I've only been really cooking for a couple of years now and I'm tickled pink to be able to make a good meal!

BTW My mom was a horrible cook, too, and she still is!

PieSusan
02-03-2009, 01:50 PM
My mom. Best cook in the world. She is from rural Oklahoma, and cooked with a Southern influence. Always simple, and always delicious!

Your answer made me smile. That is exactly how I feel! My mom was the best cook in the world, too! She and my grandma taught me how to cook and purchase the best ingredients. The taught me how to choose fruits, vegetables and meats in the store.

joec
02-03-2009, 01:53 PM
BTW My mom was a horrible cook, too, and she still is!

My mother couldn't boil water so she wouldn't cook at all. Funny too since she came from a very large farm family. The grandmother that taught me was my father's mother, he was a good cook too.

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 01:55 PM
Same here, my Mom. Rural Texas with a little German influence, a little southern, along with tex-mex.

Lots of the recipes I've posted are hers.

JimWhere abouts in Texas, Jim?

JoeV
02-03-2009, 01:55 PM
Mom taught her 5 boys to cook so they wouldn't be a burden on their wives. Go figure...

I really got into it heavily when I got tired of the same repertoire of meals that DW was cranking out for me and three kids. I said to myself...'there's got to be more food out there than THIS."

Today she will admit that I'm a more creative cook than she is, but I think she's actually getting better since the kids all moved out, and she doesn't HAVE to cook every day. Regardless, I still throw her butt out of "My Kitchen" on a regular basis and make more meals than she does.

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 01:57 PM
Playing with fire outdoors as a kid.LOL!!! That's how my son learned to cook!! (Wait a minute....Is that you, Nick?)

PanchoHambre
02-03-2009, 02:04 PM
I cooked everyday since I had kids, but it really was awful. Probably the only reason my kids and I are so healthy is because I always kept a lot of fresh, raw fruits and veggies on hand. That was reliably good, whereas anything I "cooked" was a crap-shoot at best.



LOL FM... my Mom was a god awful cook. She never cooked when I was little... we had a stack of menus on the fridge LOL... then she ended up with 3 step-kids and another of her own... take out was NOT an option anymore....oh the things that got served... mention of certain dishes still makes me cringe.... I can't blame her full time job & 5 bad kids YIKES

Somehow in the process of getting dinner on the table she became a really really good cook now she is excellent... and enjoys it.

Ol-blue
02-03-2009, 02:07 PM
My mother got me interested in cooking. She loved to cook and when she became ill when I was young, my sister and I took over preparing the meals and cleaning house for the family. Both my grandmothers were excellent cooks also.

chowhound
02-03-2009, 02:09 PM
Who got you interested in food? And when and with what type(s)?

Ahh yes..... from the first time my mother cradled me and held me to her.... Oh wait, something more recent?
:lol:

I honestly don't know. I just like cooking. Even when I was married I still used the kitchen, though her more than I. When I was a kid, 12-14, something like that, I always cooked the potatoes, garlic bread and steaks when I went camping with the folks. My father was a good griller, but I was always more consistent no matter the heat source or weather. I've only recently gotten into trying new things, like "fresh herbs" :lol:.
I like to eat, so therefore I like to cook. They are interchangeable for me.

Lefty
02-03-2009, 03:07 PM
I thinks I cooked my first meal when I was 6. It was a breakfast of scambled eggs, expresso and toast. I had watched my mom do it so many times I thought I could do it so I did. When I woke everyone up my mom looked at me in horror asking me how I reached the stove. I said I stood on a chair.:lol: She explained to me how dangerous it was, but then after tasting breakfast she said it was real good and we know my mom wouldn't lie to me ;). That afternoon she brought me into the kitchen and taught me kitchen safety. After that I always helped with the big meals. I have always been comfortable in the kitchen.

Maverick2272
02-03-2009, 03:13 PM
My mom... her meals turned out fine but bland. I wanted more so I started teaching myself how to cook. She actually started letting me cook our family meals when I was in high school, I got an A+ in Home Ec. and took it from there.
Buy the time I met DW in college I thought I was pretty proficient at it, even made her a lobster and shrimp scampi dinner once.
Then we moved to Chicago, and I got exposed to all the wonderful ethnic food out here. On day I thought hey I should try making this stuff at home, and never looked back again.
Now it is a fight to get DW to eat out, LOL! She says she prefers my cooking, but I think she is just wanting to save money!

sattie
02-03-2009, 03:18 PM
I would have to say my Dad. Although I was not much of a cook at home, it was not until I moved out and got married that I really got interested in cooking. But my Dad was my main inspiration, he was always cooking something!

joec
02-03-2009, 03:23 PM
I thinks I cooked my first meal when I was 6. It was a breakfast of scambled eggs, expresso and toast. I had watched my mom do it so many times I thought I could do it so I did. When I woke everyone up my mom looked at me in horror asking me how I reached the stove. I said I stood on a chair.:lol: She explained to me how dangerous it was, but then after tasting breakfast she said it was real good and we know my mom wouldn't lie to me ;). That afternoon she brought me into the kitchen and taught me kitchen safety. After that I always helped with the big meals. I have always been comfortable in the kitchen.

No your mom won't lie to you but Dad will, at least I will. A grand daughter of mine wanted to make me breakfast one morning of eggs, bacon and pan cakes. It was all I could do to get it down but it was still the best worse breakfast I've ever had. :smile:

homecook
02-03-2009, 04:00 PM
My mom taught me how to cook by osmosis. She went to work when I was about 10 and she expected me to have everything prepped when she got home from work. I guess I was supposed to be watching her when she cooked all those years before. lol
My grandmother came to live with us a couple years later and that's when I really got my lessons on all the good Polish foods and pastries she would make. It's taken off from there.
My mom was an ok cook, just no creativity. Her meals were hearty though.

Barb

GreenWannabe
02-03-2009, 05:24 PM
Like everybody else, the ol' tum-tum sure got my attention very early. My Mother let me help out in the kitchen after I was maybe 8 or 9; I expecially liked turning the hand crank meat grinder, and measuring the ingredients. Didn't really learn too much, though. I remember that when she used a cookbook it was Irma Rombauer's Joy of Cooking (the original). Forgot about cooking during college and later, until I got married.

My wife had very little experience, and bless her heart, my MIL was no teacher - if you ever asked, it was like "Oh, a little of this, and a dab of that, and a pinch of the other." My wife even asked her to measure her pinches and little bits and dabs so she could get some idea, but to no avail. And what she wanted most in this world was to be able to cook as well as her Mom. So, we started working on it together. I would help her to interpret what the cookbook (Better Homes & Gardens) was trying to tell her, after she misinterpreted it several times - like a low flame meant just barely lit to her, and she wondered why her strawberry pie topping didn't turn out as expected.

She became a very good cook in fairly short order, but never did think that her cornbread was as good as her Mother's (it was better). And she started a collection of cookbooks and recipies, and was no longer afraid to try anything. Cooking became one of the activities we shared, especially on the weekends. After we moved to Florida, we had her Mother, one or another of her fours sisters and their families, and variou other folks stay with us a lot - her Mother stayed with us for at least half the year every year for 10 years. The sisters generally didn't help much, so Barbara was quite happy to have me helping her.

When Barbara had cancer surgery in 1998, I started taking over more and more of the cooking. The next day after she came home from the hospital, I went all out - I had bought a beef brisket on sale, and found a recipie in BH&G for that with an onion sauce, and fixed a frosted cauliflower and some other vegetable to go with it. She loved it. The Thanksgiving before she died, I did a full traditional Thanksgiving dinner, as she always had before. We were in an RV by this time, with only a combination microwave/convection oven. Kinda hard making giblet gravy when the only way you can get giblets any more is to buy a whole turkey, and it wouldn't fit so I had breast and drumsticks, but I got it made anyway, with cornbread dressing from scratch biscuits and cornbread, and about 8 or 9 veggies, pumpkin pie, sweet potato pie, mince meat pie, etc. Memorable!!

Since she died five years ago, I haven't had the heart to cook much - just when my daughter wanted home cooking and came over. Lately, I've been cooking more again, but there is no way that it is the same. But I'm working on it. I'm trying some Greek, some Mexican, some old standbys, and I'm doing OK - just not as ofter as I should.

Fred

jim_slagle
02-03-2009, 05:33 PM
Where abouts in Texas, Jim?

few miles east of Wichita Falls, little place named Henrietta.

Worked in WF a few years, moved to Dallas and was there 20 years. Also spent a time in Houston, Austin, and San Antonio. Moved to Virginia with the same company in 1996 and retired here a few years ago.

Jim

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 05:36 PM
few miles east of Wichita Falls, little place named Henrietta.

Worked in WF a few years, moved to Dallas and was there 20 years. Also spent a time in Houston, Austin, and San Antonio. Moved to Virginia with the same company in 1996 and retired here a few years ago.

JimI've never been to Henrietta. :sad: I was wondering because we have a lot of little, german-settled towns around here.

Good time to retire, Jim. Even Texas is losing jobs right and left!!!

suziquzie
02-03-2009, 05:58 PM
My parents mostly. A good meal was important to them.... never made stuff from cans and boxes very often.... I always thought I was missing out on things!!!

My Italian neighborhood in the Bronx......it always smelled SO GOOD!!!!!! I lived there from birth to age 12...... so between my Dad loving to cook and all the cooking going on around me, it had to rub off!

Adillo303
02-03-2009, 07:17 PM
A girlfriend, her idea of cooking was either restaurants (actually tke better choice) or cook itOn one side till the smoke alarm went off then flip it and the next time it went off it eas done. Most things were served crunchy.

I started out of self defense. I then found that I lile my cooking. I then stayted baking bread after that visits to cooking websites.

AC

smoke king
02-03-2009, 07:29 PM
I was kind of a late bloomer. I think the advent of Food Network lit the fire. I can remember in the mid 90's, after a show, you could send a sase to them and request particular recipes featured on the shows (no computer for me back then)

I got a few, tried them, got some more and tried them too. Success rate wasn't real high, but what I didn't realize at the time was that I was learning. Of course, any questions I had I would call my Mom, and she usually talked me through it. When she passed away, I realized that a lot of the wonderful food I'd grown up with was now missing from my life, so I set out to learn that as well. One Christmas it occured to me that if I ever wanted another homemade Christmas cookie, I'd better learn to bake. So through trial and (much) error, I was able to get a handle on that too.

Somewhere along the way, I started to enjoy it. There is a certain satisfaction in watching other folks enjoy your efforts, and it doesn't hurt that I can eat them too!!!

Keltin
02-03-2009, 08:29 PM
I initially got interested in cooking as a necessity. I like to be self-reliant and do everything myself. I even taught myself to sew so I didn’t have to ask someone else to do it for me! But, cooking can be quite addictive, and I soon learned that, beyond being a necessity, it is very fun. To create something from nothing that you and others will enjoy is very satisfying. Plus, playing with all those kitchen gadgets is a blast! :chef:

chowhound
02-03-2009, 08:44 PM
Keltin, nice to see you again, but sewing sucks :lol:

Fred
formerly known as pacanis :ohmy:

Keltin
02-03-2009, 09:03 PM
Keltin, nice to see you again, but sewing sucks :lol:

Fred
formerly known as pacanis :ohmy:

Pacanis! How are ya! Good to see you again. Sewing isn’t all that, but you have to do it on occasion and……ok, maybe it does suck! :lol:

uh, no offense to the better sewers out there! :whistling:

But if I ever “sit and split” as the Billy Mays commercial says (Mighty Mendit), I can fix it myself and no one ever need know! Besides, you ought to see the crazy curtains I made for my game room. :shock::yum:

Maverick2272
02-03-2009, 09:14 PM
I can sew... if I absolutely have to! But my next door neighbor that we are on really good terms with was a seamstress...that works out pretty good I think!

Lefty
02-03-2009, 09:16 PM
I sew, cook, iron and clean. I guess my mom thought it would take me a long time to find someone. I appreciate it though since I can do anything I want and have. Thanks mom. :thumb:

chowhound
02-03-2009, 09:16 PM
Pacanis! How are ya! Good to see you again. Sewing isn’t all that, but you have to do it on occasion and……ok, maybe it does suck! :lol:

uh, no offense to the better sewers out there! :whistling:

But if I ever “sit and split” as the Billy Mays commercial says (Mighty Mendit), I can fix it myself and no one ever need know! Besides, you ought to see the crazy curtains I made for my game room. :shock::yum:

You da man. I'm still tring to put buttons on with plastic doo-hickeys and repair vinyl with brush on caulking.... :tongue:

Keltin
02-03-2009, 09:25 PM
You da man. I'm still tring to put buttons on with plastic doo-hickeys and repair vinyl with brush on caulking.... :tongue:

Hey, all you need are two things in life to fix nearly everything. Duct Tape and WD40! If it moves and it shouldn't....Duct Tape. If it doesn't move and it should.....WD40! :lol:

Keltin
02-03-2009, 09:26 PM
I sew, cook, iron and clean. I guess my mom thought it would take me a long time to find someone. I appreciate it though since I can do anything I want and have. Thanks mom. :thumb:

That made me laugh!! :lol:

pugger
02-03-2009, 10:13 PM
My Mom. Mainly making french fries when I was a little boy. I thought french fries would always be that good - they usually are not.

She would vehemently object to my praise so don't tell her.

PanchoHambre
02-03-2009, 10:21 PM
Hey, all you need are two things in life to fix nearly everything. Duct Tape and WD40! If it moves and it shouldn't....Duct Tape. If it doesn't move and it should.....WD40! :lol:

That was my step-dads tool box.... I learned from the best:neutral:

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 10:25 PM
That was my step-dads tool box.... I learned from the best:neutral:Yep, I gotta admit - I'm sitting in my home office and I'm looking right at two rolls of duct tape and a can of WD-40 sitting on my desk. I guess I should get a tool box for them.

JoeV
02-03-2009, 10:34 PM
Besides, you ought to see the crazy curtains I made for my game room. :shock::yum: I have an old Kenmore sewing machine and make my own custom bags for the fly rods that I build. No, DW does not know how to operate it, and I actually do repairs and alterations for her on her clothes. If a man sews, he's a Tailor, not a seamstress.

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 10:38 PM
I have an old Kenmore sewing machine and make my own custom bags for the fly rods that I build. No, DW does not know how to operate it, and I actually do repairs and alterations for her on her clothes. If a man sews, he's a Tailor, not a seamstress.There you go, Joe! I taught my son to sew and I gave him a sewing machine as a wedding present.

joec
02-03-2009, 10:42 PM
Yep, I gotta admit - I'm sitting in my home office and I'm looking right at two rolls of duct tape and a can of WD-40 sitting on my desk. I guess I should get a tool box for them.

In my line of work it is very close to the perfect tool box in addition to WD-40 we use White Grease and Rubbing Alcohol. No with a storage facility we use WD-40 for tenant's locks, white grease for lubing the doors and gate chain with the alcohol used this time of year in a spray bottle to unfreeze locks. Can't live without those three things in this business. I do keep them in a tool box too. :smile:

PanchoHambre
02-03-2009, 10:52 PM
everyone should be able to cook a meal, sew a button, drive a stick and shoot a gun even if you don't actually need to do it... you never know... i got 3 out of 4

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 10:53 PM
In my line of work it is very close to the perfect tool box in addition to WD-40 we use White Grease and Rubbing Alcohol. No with a storage facility we use WD-40 for tenant's locks, white grease for lubing the doors and gate chain with the alcohol used this time of year in a spray bottle to unfreeze locks. Can't live without those three things in this business. I do keep them in a tool box too. :smile:OK, I had to google White Grease and damn, I need some of that, too. Luckily, there's no such thing as a frozen lock in Texas.:smile:

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 10:53 PM
everyone should be able to cook a meal, sew a button, drive a stick and shoot a gun even if you don't actually need to do it... you never know... i got 3 out of 4Me, too. Can you guess which ones?

Keltin
02-03-2009, 10:56 PM
everyone should be able to cook a meal, sew a button, drive a stick and shoot a gun even if you don't actually need to do it... you never know... i got 3 out of 4


I can do all 4 so I guess I've learned it all then huh? I wish! :yum:

PanchoHambre
02-03-2009, 10:58 PM
well you can cook and sew so its the car or the gun... I'l bet you can shoot.

I have never shot a gun... hate them... but feel it is one of those things you should at least be able to do

PanchoHambre
02-03-2009, 11:01 PM
I can do all 4 so I guess I've learned it all then huh? I wish! :yum:

well its a damn good start.... my parents are NYers to the core very savvy but not very self sufficient they are sort of mystified as to why I like tools and cooking

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 11:05 PM
well you can cook and sew so its the car or the gun... I'l bet you can shoot.

I have never shot a gun... hate them... but feel it is one of those things you should at least be able to doNah, it's the car. I used to sell cars so I had to teach people how to drive a stick if I wanted to sell them an RX7. I'm embarrassed to admit I've never shot a gun since they practically issue them to you with your birth certificate here in Texas!

joec
02-03-2009, 11:06 PM
OK, I had to google White Grease and damn, I need some of that, too. Luckily, there's no such thing as a frozen lock in Texas.:smile:

I actually buy it from WalMart's Auto department. WD-40 would work for doors too but will attract dirt over time while this stuff won't and stays slick for a lot longer. Rubbing alcohol also works as an emergency anti freeze. At any rate a bottle of it is much cheaper than the little cans of lock deicer[.sp?]. :smile:

Keltin
02-03-2009, 11:11 PM
well you can cook and sew so its the car or the gun... I'l bet you can shoot.

I have never shot a gun... hate them... but feel it is one of those things you should at least be able to do

Guns to me are neat. Very intricate and smooth running tools. I’m always impressed in both their simplicity and complexity. All parts moving as one to get the job done.

But, I don’t really like them in general (definitely do not own one and never have). As a neat mechanism and noise maker, they are fun for some target practice, but for what most people use them for (damage, destruction, power, etc), I hate them. I’d rather we do what the Japanese did centuries ago and melt down all our guns and everyone go back to swords! Let’s see some coward do a drive-bay with a katana! :lol:

joec
02-03-2009, 11:21 PM
Actually the Japanese can make but a limited number of swords. Seems it is part of the surrender terms at the end of WWII.

PanchoHambre
02-03-2009, 11:26 PM
Nah, it's the car. I used to sell cars so I had to teach people how to drive a stick if I wanted to sell them an RX7. I'm embarrassed to admit I've never shot a gun since they practically issue them to you with your birth certificate here in Texas!

A Texan who can't shoot:confused:... I was amazed how common guns were when I moved down there. Aside from my step-granddads hunting rifle there were just no guns around in my childhood and there it was like having a blender... and I love RX7s.

Guns to me are neat. Very intricate and smooth running tools. I’m always impressed in both their simplicity and complexity. All parts moving as one to get the job done.

But, I don’t really like them in general (definitely do not own one and never have). As a neat mechanism and noise maker, they are fun for some target practice, but for what most people use them for (damage, destruction, power, etc), I hate them.

Agreed... here in the summer you can play "gunshot or firecracker" while grilling out

Fisher's Mom
02-03-2009, 11:27 PM
A Texan who can't shoot:confused:... I was amazed how common guns were when I moved down there. Aside from my step-granddads hunting rifle there were just no guns around in my childhood and there it was like having a blenderI know, I know. I'm hanging my head in shame.

AllenOK
02-03-2009, 11:46 PM
Well, on the original topic:
Like a lot of folks, my Mom was my first influence. She started out cooking on the family farm for all her siblings and the farm hands. I started learning a few basic things shortly after my father passed away. Scrambled eggs, hamburger helper, soup starter, etc. Those are easy.

After my Mom remarried, when I was 19/20, my step-father was doing some pretty broad hinting about my getting a place of my own. I knew that soon, I would be out on my own, and that other than burgers, hamburger helper, and a few other things, I really didn't know how to cook. I didn't feel like starving. I bought a few cookbooks, and set about teaching myself some things. More than just "how to cook", but "what to buy", especially "what can I buy cheaply" to make XXX dish.

I was starting to get a handle on things.

Suddenly, a lot sooner than I had anticipated, I had an apartment, and a roommate (my grandmother). My Mom warned me that "Granny" only knew how to cook three things, beans, coffee, and toast, and liked all three burnt, so if I wanted anything good to eat, I had to cook it myself.

Isn't it amazing how an empty belly motivates a person to learn to cook?

I was given a few older cookbook by my mother. I bought a few more on my own. Within a year, I was "fairly" competent. Within 4 years, I was getting really adventurous, at least, so I thought. Some of my co-workers had noted my ability to cook at home, since I was bringing in my own lunches. A couple even suggested that since I liked to cook, why don't I go get my Culinary Arts degree and cook in real restaurants?

The rest is history.

On some of the side-topics:

Yes, I can sew. I got tired of waiting for my Mom to sew my merit badges and/or new rank onto my BSA uniform, so I "borrowed" one of her needles and thread and started doing it myself. She even gave me a sewing machine, which I know a little about using. I have a pic, I may have to post, of my in my Capote (handmade by me), using a metal detector in the snow up in Michigan.

Yes, I can shoot a gun (thanks to Rifle Shooting Merit Badge), although I don't own any.

I have driven a stick, once. I can probably do it again, but I prefer automatics.

joec
02-03-2009, 11:50 PM
Funny I was raised by a cop which meant knowing how to shot, military experience, carried a gun in my job for much of my life and haven't owned one since 1984. Now I have a house full of swords and knives.

Keltin
02-03-2009, 11:58 PM
Now I have a house full of swords and knives.

I feel you on that one! Lot's of blades around here as well. I just love 'em!

High Cheese
02-04-2009, 11:07 AM
I've always been a tad interested. I used to make my own omelettes when I was a teenager. I really got into it because of my wife. Years ago she made a homemade dinner for me and I was hooked ever since. I used to think I was really cooking adding ingredients to jarred tomato sauce. LOL Now, I can't remember the last time I bought it.

I started really liking Italian food, now I'm more into French or modern dishes.